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Short kids may have higher future stroke risk

Thu, 02/15/2018 - 04:19
Embargoed until 4 a.m. CT / 5 a.m. ET Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018

DALLAS, Feb. 15, 2018 –  Being a short kid is associated with increased risk of having a stroke in adulthood, according to Danish research published in Stroke, an American Heart Association journal.

A prospective study examined data on more than 300,000 Danish schoolchildren – born between 1930-1989 who were examined at ages 7, 10 and 13. Researchers noted that boys and girls who were 2 to 3 inches shorter than average for their age were at increased risk of clot-related (ischemic) stroke in adult men and women and of bleeding stroke in men.

While adult height is genetically determined, it is also influenced by factors such as maternal diet during pregnancy, childhood diet, infection and psychological stress. Several of these factors are modifiable and all are thought to affect the risk of stroke.

Researchers noted that a decline in stroke incidence and mortality rates in most high-income countries, primarily in women, occurred simultaneously with a general increase in attained adult height. Taken together, this suggests the involvement of shared underlying mechanisms for height and stroke development.

Researchers say these results have implications for understanding disease origin rather than for clinical risk prediction and future studies should focus on the mechanisms underlying the relationship between childhood height and later stroke.

“Our study suggests that short height in children is a possible marker of stroke risk and suggests these children should pay extra attention to changing or treating modifiable risk factors for stroke throughout life to reduce the chances of having this disease,” said senior study author Jennifer L. Baker, Ph.D., associate professor in the Center for Clinical Research and Prevention at Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital and Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, at the University of Copenhagen, in Denmark.

Funding sources and author disclosures are detailed in the manuscript.

Additional Resources:

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Statements and conclusions of study authors published in American Heart Association scientific journals are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect the association’s policy or position. The association makes no representation or guarantee as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations and health insurance providers are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA/ASA Spokesperson Perspective: 214.706.1173

Bridgette McNeill: 214.706.1135; bridgette.mcneill@heart.org

For Public Inquiries: 1-800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

 

]]>Heart NewsStroke NewsThu, 15 Feb 2018 10:00:05 GMTBeing a short kid is associated with increased risk of having a stroke in adulthood, according to Danish research published in Stroke, an American Heart Association journal.https://newsroom.heart.org/news/short-kids-may-have-higher-future-stroke-riskThu, 15 Feb 2018 10:00:00 GMT

Survivors of childhood heart defects may have higher risk of premature dementia

Mon, 02/12/2018 - 04:44
Study Highlight:

  • Children born with heart defects are more likely to survive into old age because of improved early treatments, but they may be more likely to develop early-onset dementia than people born without heart defects.

Embargoed until 4 a.m. CT / 5 a.m. ET Monday, February 12, 2018

DALLAS, February 12, 2018 — People born with heart defects who survive into adulthood may be at higher risk of developing dementia, particularly dementia that starts before 65 years of age, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

With improved newborn and childhood treatments, more people born with heart defects survive into adulthood. A 2016 study published in Circulation estimated that approximately 1.4 million adults are living with congenital heart defects in the United States.

“Previous studies showed that people born with heart defects have a higher risk of neurodevelopmental problems in childhood, such as epilepsy and autism, but this is, to our knowledge, the first study to examine the potential for dementia later in adult life,” said Carina N. Bagge, B.Sc., lead author of the study and a medical student in the Department of Clinical Epidemiology at Aarhus University Hospital in Aarhus, Denmark.

Using national medical databases and records covering all Danish hospitals, the researchers examined the occurrence of dementia in 10,632 mostly Caucasian adults (46 percent male) born with heart defects between 1890 and 1982 (most between 1960 and 1982), matching each with 10 members of the general population of the same gender born the same year.

Researchers found the risk of dementia from any cause, including vascular dementia, Alzheimer’s disease and others, in people born with heart defects in Denmark was:

  • 60 percent higher overall than the general population;
  • 160 percent (2.6 times) higher for early-onset dementia (diagnosed before age 65);
  • 30 percent higher for dementia diagnosed after age 65.

The study was observational, which means that the researchers were examining individuals with heart defects over time to see if there was an association between being born with a heart defect and developing dementia later in life. While they did find an association, the study does not mean that every person who was born with a heart defect will develop dementia. The study observed a higher risk, but did not prove cause and effect.

Heart defects are the most common group of birth defects, occurring in 4 to 10 of every 1,000 live births in the United States and 8 to 10 out of every 1,000 live births in Denmark’.

“Our study involved an older population born when treatments for heart defects were more limited. Modern treatment has improved greatly, and as a result we can’t directly generalize these results to children born today. We need further work to understand the risks in the modern era,” Bagge said.

Dementia or cognitive impairment is often progressive, and can be caused by many factors, including reduced blood flow to the brain, strokes and Alzheimer’s disease. People with dementia may have problems with memory, reasoning, behavior and other mental functions.

In this study, the risk of dementia was higher in people born with heart defects who developed other heart disease risk factors later in life, such as atrial fibrillation, heart failure, and diabetes. These risk factors are more common in people born with heart defects than in the general population, and they have also been shown to independently raise the risk of dementia.

“While we must be careful to appreciate these findings within the limitations of the study design, continued study of this association may yield important clinical screening and medical management strategies in the future, and there may even be opportunities discovered to aid in the prevention of dementia in this population,” said Nicolas L. Madsen, M.D., M.P.H., senior author of the study and assistant professor of pediatrics at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center.

Co-authors are Victor W. Henderson, M.D., M.S.; Henning B. Laursen, M.D., D.M.Sc.; Kasper Adelborg, M.D., Ph.D.; and Morten Olsen, M.D., Ph.D. Author disclosures are on the manuscript.

The study was funded by the Department of Clinical Epidemiology at Aarhus University Hospital, the Heart Institute at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, the National Institute on Aging, the Foundation of the Family Kjaersgaard Sunds, the Foundation of 1870, the Foundation of Raimond and Dagmar Ringgaard-Bohn, the Foundation of Torben and Alice Frimodt, the Foundation of the Family Hede-Nielsen, and the Oticon Foundation.

Additional Resources:

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Statements and conclusions of study authors published in American Heart Association scientific journals are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect the association’s policy or position. The association makes no representation or guarantee as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations and health insurance providers are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA/ASA Spokesperson Perspective: 214-706-1173

Staff Contact: Darcy Spitz: 212-878-5940; darcy.spitz@heart.org

For Public Inquiries: 1-800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

 

]]>Heart NewsStroke NewsMon, 12 Feb 2018 10:00:06 GMTStudy Highlight: Children born with heart defects are more likely to survive into old age because of improved early treatments, but they may be more likely to develop early-onset dementia than people born without heart defects. https://newsroom.heart.org/news/survivors-of-childhood-heart-defects-may-have-higher-risk-of-premature-dementiaMon, 12 Feb 2018 10:00:00 GMT

Stroke journal features women’s studies on how gender influences stroke risk, treatment and outcomes

Thu, 02/08/2018 - 04:31
Embargoed until 4 a.m. CT / 5 a.m. ET Thurs., Feb. 8, 2018

DALLAS, Feb. 8, 2018 — Many aspects of strokes affect women and men differently, and four articles in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke highlight recent research and identify future research needs.

“Gender influences all aspects of stroke, from risk factors, treatments and outcomes,” said Marc Fisher, M.D editor in chief of the Stroke journal and professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts. “Highlighting these studies, all led by female researchers, in February, a month when the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association focuses on women’s health with Go Red For Women, is important. For too long, gender influences were not adequately studied.”

The studies include:

Stroke risk factors unique to women

Stroke is the third leading cause of death in women in the United States and is a leading cause of disability. Each year 55,000 more women than men have a stroke, a discrepancy largely driven by longer life expectancy in women.

This review highlights stroke risk factors specific to women, including fluctuations in naturally occurring hormone levels over women’s lives; adverse effects of supplemental hormones used as contraception or to treat menopausal symptoms; and pregnancy and pregnancy-related complications. The authors suggest that future research is needed to determine whether stroke risk prediction models should include risk factors specific to women such as supplemental hormones and pregnancy.

Preeclampsia: Association with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and stroke

Preeclampsia is a complication of pregnancy characterized by high blood pressure which can cause damage to the brain, kidneys and liver. Preeclampsia can advance to eclampsia, which is characterized by seizures. Both of these conditions are associated with an increased risk of maternal death, ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke. Preeclampsia is a treatable and possibly preventable condition which complicates up to 5 percent of pregnancies. The treatment for preeclampsia/eclampsia includes anti-hypertensives and magnesium.

According to this review, the risk of future ischemic stroke is approximately 80 percent greater in women with a history of preeclampsia than in those without the condition. Women whose pregnancy is complicated by preeclampsia or eclampsia should be counseled on the signs and symptoms of stroke and monitored closely in the postpartum period. 

A focused update of sex differences in patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) after stroke

This study is an updated review of sex differences in patient reported outcome measures less than 12 months after stroke, using data from studies published since 2007.

The review confirms that after stroke women suffer more activity limitations, worse health related quality of life and more post stroke depression than men, but do not have worse cognitive impairment or challenges in dealing with everyday life compared to men. The authors note that there is a pressing need for high-quality population-based studies of sex differences in patient reported outcome measures after stroke. Studies exploring potential modifiable contributors to these differences are needed so effective interventions to reduce sex disparities in outcomes can be designed.

Impact of Conventional Stroke Risk Factors on Stroke in Women: An Update

Due to increasing stroke risk with age and a longer life expectancy, women experience more strokes and more death from stroke over their lifetime and have worse functional outcomes following stroke. This study reviews current literature (2013 to present) on ischemic strokes, the most common type of stroke caused by narrowing or blockages in the arteries leading to the brain, and the degree to which conventional risk factors affect men and women differently. 

It concludes that risk factors -- including diabetes, metabolic syndrome, atrial fibrillation and migraine -- carry greater ischemic stroke risk for women compared with men. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors that significantly raises the risk of heart disease and stroke; atrial fibrillation is a heart rhythm disorder. The association between elevated cholesterol and stroke may be slightly higher among men, and the role of high blood pressure is complicated, with varying effects based on age/race/ethnicity and gender.

The authors also note that treatment disparities between men and women leading to suboptimal stroke prevention in women need to be addressed.

Editorial: Stroke in Women

In this edition of Stroke, the papers by McDermott, Demel, Madsen, Gall/Lisabeth and colleagues argue for further recognition of the factors causing stroke in women as well as for systematic intensification of treatments. Sex differences in stroke burden are most influenced by differences in cardiovascular risk factor burden; thus, the greatest gains in stroke prevention will come from increased screening and treatment of these primary risk factors in women early in life, especially in the obese, women in pregnancy, and those from high-risk ethnoracial groups.

Co-authors, funding sources and author disclosures are on the manuscripts.

Additional Resources:

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Statements and conclusions of study authors published in American Heart Association scientific journals are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect the association’s policy or position. The association makes no representation or guarantee as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations and health insurance providers are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke –  the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies, and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

About the American Stroke Association

The American Stroke Association is devoted to saving people from stroke — the No. 2 cause of death in the world and a leading cause of serious disability. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat stroke. The Dallas-based association officially launched in 1998 as a division of the American Heart Association. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-888-4STROKE or visit StrokeAssociation.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA/ASA Spokesperson Perspective: 214-706-1173

Darcy Spitz: 212-878-5940; darcy.spitz@heart.org.

For Public Inquiries: 1-800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

 

 

]]>Heart NewsStroke NewsThu, 08 Feb 2018 10:00:04 GMTMany aspects of strokes affect women and men differently, and four articles in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke highlight recent research and identify future research needs.https://newsroom.heart.org/news/stroke-journal-features-womens-studies-on-how-gender-influences-stroke-risk-treatment-and-outcomesThu, 08 Feb 2018 10:00:00 GMT

Top heart disease and stroke research advances of 2017

Wed, 02/07/2018 - 15:11
DALLAS, Feb. 7, 2018 — New medicines to fight heart disease, updated guidelines for strokes and high blood pressure, and research into genome editing are among the top heart disease and stroke advances in 2017, according to the American Heart Association, the world’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disease and stroke.

The Association, one of the top funders of heart- and stroke-related research worldwide, has been compiling an annual top 10 list of major advances in heart disease and stroke science since 1996. Here, in no particular order, are the organization’s picks for leading research accomplishments published in 2017.

Advancing the treatment of strokes

Following publication in 2017 of the DAWN study in The New England Journal of Medicine showing benefits of mechanical clot removal for longer periods after a stroke starts, the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association released new guidelines for treating acute ischemic stroke. The guidelines were released at the International Stroke Conference in January 2018 and included additional data from DEFUSE 3, also presented at the meeting.

The new guidelines, published in the journal Stroke, say the clot-removal treatment window may be increased from six hours to up to 24 hours for specific patients who have clots in large vessels in the brain. The guidelines also increase the number of patients who will have access to a clot-dissolving drug proven to lower the chances for disability. The guidelines reiterated the need for fast action when a person shows the symptoms of a stroke, the second-leading cause of death in the world and a leading cause of disability.

Fixing a gene mutation in human embryos

A study in Nature suggests genome editing could be used to correct disease-causing mutations in the heart muscle of human embryos. Researchers focused on the MYBPC3 gene – which provides instructions for making a protein found in heart muscle cells and causes a form of inherited hypertrophic cardiomyopathy – and used new approaches to allow safe and accurate correction of the abnormal gene.

While early, this research furthers the potential for genome editing to correct mutations that pass from parent to child.

New high blood pressure guidelines for teens and children

For children, “normal” blood pressure varies based on gender, age and height. So for years, doctors had to refer to sets of charts to calculate whether a child’s blood pressure was normal or high.

Last August, the American Academy of Pediatrics simplified the process by issuing updated guidelines for diagnosing, evaluating and treating children and adolescents with high blood pressure. The guidelines, published in Pediatrics, provide a short, easy-to-understand table that uses a child’s age and gender to determine whether blood pressure is elevated or not.

The AHA and American College of Cardiology released new guidelines for adults last November at the Association’s annual Scientific Sessions. The guidance, published in the American Heart Association’s journal, Hypertension, redefined what should be classified as high blood pressure, also known as hypertension. Experts looking at the newest data defined hypertension as a reading of 130 (for the top, or systolic, number) or 80 (for the bottom, or diastolic, number). In the past, hypertension was defined as 140/90.

The change means 46 percent of U.S. adults are identified as having high blood pressure, compared with 32 percent under the previous definition. Lifestyle changes alone, without the need for medication, are recommended for the majority of Americans with newly diagnosed high blood pressure, according to the guidelines.

Economic recession affects the cardiovascular health of African-American teens

Previous research has shown that low household income can adversely affect patients’ health, but a new study found the health of some African-American teenagers was particularly impacted five years following the Great Recession that lasted from 2007-2009.

The study, in the Journal of the American Heart Association, found that 16- and 17-year-olds in the rural U.S. Southeast whose families suffered a financial downturn after the recession showed higher rates of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of disorders that may include abdominal obesity, high blood pressure, high blood sugar and high cholesterol. The results suggest the need for secondary prevention efforts for teens, including lifestyle modification, during and after a large-scale economic decline.

A deeper understanding of heart health for those living in food deserts

Health researchers have focused a lot in recent years on so-called food deserts: low-income neighborhoods with low access to healthy food. But a new study found that it’s not so much the “desert” itself as it is low income in general that is linked to poor heart health.

The study, in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, studied food deserts in metro Atlanta and found people who live there have higher rates of cardiovascular risk factors such as oxidative stress, inflammation and arterial stiffness. However, researchers concluded these associations are mostly due to low income of the area and its residents rather than proximity to a grocery store – a finding which could impact the future use of public health resources in poor neighborhoods.

Cholesterol-lowering drug cuts risk of heart attacks and strokes

A study in The New England Journal of Medicine found that the new injectable cholesterol-lowering drug evolocumab can reduce heart attacks and strokes among high-risk patients. The FOURIER study – paid for by Amgen, which makes and sells the PCSK9 inhibitor evolocumab under the brand name Repatha – showed that the drug cut the risk of having a heart attack, stroke or dying from a cardiovascular cause by 20 percent when added to intensive statin therapy.

The study reported that Repatha lowered “bad” LDL cholesterol by about 60 percent, to a median of 30.

SGLT2 inhibitors may lower rates of death and heart failure for people with diabetes

A large international study in Circulation showed lower rates of death and heart failure for diabetes patients treated with the SGLT2 inhibitors canagliflozin, dapagliflozin or empagliflozin, compared with other glucose-lowering drugs. The CVD-REAL study – paid for by AstraZeneca, which markets dapagliflozin under the brand name Farxiga – looked at more than 300,000 patients with Type 2 diabetes in the U.S., the U.K., Denmark, Norway and Sweden. The results suggest SGLT2 inhibitors may benefit a broad population of patients with Type 2 diabetes.

Improved therapy for treating patients with peripheral artery disease

According to a study in The Lancet, combining low doses of the blood thinner rivaroxaban and aspirin is more effective than aspirin alone in preventing cardiovascular deaths, heart attacks, strokes and major amputations for people with peripheral artery disease, or PAD.

The 33-country COMPASS study looked at 7,470 patients with PAD, a narrowing of the peripheral arteries to the legs, arms, stomach and head. Although major bleeding increased with the combination therapy, fatal or critical organ bleeding did not. Researchers said the new approach is a major advance in treating patients with peripheral artery disease.

A new treatment for fighting inflammation and reducing cardiovascular events

Scientists have long believed that reducing inflammation may reduce the risk of heart disease. The CANTOS study published in The New England Journal of Medicine looked at more than 10,000 high-risk patients who previously had heart attacks and found that canakinumab, a monoclonal antibody that targets interleukin-1 beta and blocks inflammation, significantly lowered their rate of having or dying from a heart attack, stroke or other cardiovascular cause. Although the drug did not reduce overall deaths from any cause and was associated with significant side effects, the principle underlying the use of a specific anti-inflammatory antibody is important.

Catheter-based procedure extended for more patients with aortic stenosis

Aortic stenosis – a narrowing of the aortic valve opening – is a common and serious valve disease problem. For patients with severe aortic stenosis at high risk for surgical complications, a procedure called transcatheter aortic-valve replacement, or TAVR, that can be done through a catheter rather than with open-heart surgery, is already an accepted alternative.

The SURTAVI study in The New England Journal of Medicine looked at severe aortic stenosis patients at intermediate risk for complications from surgery and found TAVR to be a viable alternative for them as well.

Additional Resources:

  • Follow AHA/ASA news on Twitter @HeartNews
  • For updates and new science from the Circulation journal follow @CircAHA

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The information is available via an American Heart Association News story. Media may leverage this content for linking, quoting and excerpting. Copyright is owned or held by American Heart Association and all rights are reserved, but permission is granted, at no cost and without need for further request, to link to, quote or excerpt from these stories in any medium anywhere as long as the text is not altered and proper attribution is made to American Heart Association News. Full terms of use and attribution language can be found here.

Statements and conclusions of study authors published in American Heart Association scientific journals are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect the association’s policy or position. The association makes no representation or guarantee as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations and health insurance providers are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA/ASA Spokesperson Perspective: 214-706-1173

Carrie Thacker: 214-706-1665; carrie.thacker@heart.org

For Public Inquiries: 1-800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

 

]]>Heart NewsStroke NewsWed, 07 Feb 2018 21:07:31 GMTNew medicines to fight heart disease, updated guidelines for strokes and high blood pressure, and research into genome editing are among the top heart disease and stroke advances in 2017, according to the American Heart Association, the world’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disease and stroke.https://newsroom.heart.org/news/top-heart-disease-and-stroke-research-advances-of-2017Wed, 07 Feb 2018 20:51:00 GMT

Severe pre-eclampsia often leads to undetected high blood pressure after pregnancy

Mon, 02/05/2018 - 04:59
Study Highlights:

  • Hypertension commonly occurs in the year following pregnancy among women who had severe pre-eclampsia during pregnancy.
  • The lingering hypertension may go unnoticed because it often doesn’t present as classic high readings in the doctor’s office.
  • Offering post-pregnancy ambulatory blood pressure monitoring to all women who have severe pre-eclampsia may help detect those whose blood pressures might be high despite normal readings in doctors’ offices.

Embargoed 4 a.m. CT / 5 a.m. ET Monday, February 5, 2018

DALLAS, Feb. 5, 2018 – Lingering hypertension is common and may go unnoticed among women who have severe pre-eclampsia during pregnancy, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

Pre-eclampsia, which is when a woman develops hypertension and elevated protein in the urine during pregnancy, occurs in three to five percent of pregnancies in the developed world. Recent studies have shown that women with pre-eclampsia are more likely than women with normal blood pressure during pregnancy to have high blood pressure post-pregnancy.

Women with severe pre-eclampsia can be seven times more susceptible to develop future cardiovascular disease compared to women with a normal blood pressure during pregnancy, according to study author Laura Benschop, M.D., a researcher in obstetrics and gynecology at Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

“The problem is high blood pressure after pregnancy often goes unnoticed because many of these women have normal blood pressure readings in the doctor’s office,” Benschop said. “We aimed to determine how common it is for women who have pre-eclampsia to have high blood pressure in the year after pregnancy, by looking at more than just their blood pressure readings in the doctor’s office.”

Benschop and colleagues studied 200 women who during their pregnancies were diagnosed with severe pre-eclampsia, defined by such criteria as a systolic blood pressure of 160 mmHg or higher and/or diastolic blood pressure of 110 mmHg or higher. They followed the women for one year after their pregnancies, monitoring blood pressure during the day and night and taking blood pressure readings in the clinic.

They found:

  • More than 41 percent of the women in the study had high blood pressure in the year after pregnancy.
  • The most common type of hypertension detected (17.5 percent) was masked hypertension, which is normal blood pressure in the doctor’s office, but high readings outside of the office; followed by sustained hypertension (14.5 percent); then, white coat hypertension (9.5 percent), which occurs when people have higher blood pressure readings at the doctor’s office than outside the clinic setting.
  • If the ambulatory readings hadn’t been taken and only in-clinic readings were used, doctors would have missed 56 percent of the women with high blood pressure.
  • Forty-six percent of the women studied had an insufficient decrease in blood pressure from daytime to nighttime, which is unhealthy.
  • Night-time hypertension, which increases the risk of heart disease, stroke and death, affected 42.5 percent of women in the study.

“Our findings suggest women who have high blood pressure during pregnancy should continue to monitor their blood pressure long after they’ve delivered their babies. It’s not only important to monitor blood pressure in the doctor’s office, but also at different times of the day and night, at home,” Benschop said. “We’ve shown here that high blood pressure comes in many forms after pregnancy. Women who know their numbers can take the proper steps to lower their blood pressure and avoid the health consequences of high blood pressure later in life.”

This study has limitations, including that the findings might not be applicable across races and income levels. The women in this study were predominately highly educated and Caucasian.

According to new hypertension treatment guidelines recently released by the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines, high blood pressure is now defined as readings of 130 mm Hg and higher for the systolic blood pressure measurement, or readings of 80 and higher for the diastolic measurement. That is a change from the old definition of 140/90 and higher, reflecting complications that can occur at those lower numbers.

Co-authors are Johannes J Duvekot, M.D., Ph.D.; Jorie Versmissen, M.D., Ph.D.; Valeska van Broekhoven, M.D.; Eric AP Steegers, M.D., Ph.D.; and Jeanine E Roeters van Lennep, M.D., Ph.D. Author disclosures are on the manuscript.

This study did not receive outside funding.

Additional Resources:

###

Statements and conclusions of study authors published in American Heart Association scientific journals are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect the association’s policy or position. The association makes no representation or guarantee as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations and health insurance providers are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA/ASA Spokesperson Perspective: 214-706-1173

Carrie Thacker: 214-706-1665; carrie.thacker@heart.org

For Public Inquiries: 1-800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

 

 

 

]]>Heart NewsStroke NewsMon, 05 Feb 2018 10:00:04 GMTStudy Highlights: Hypertension commonly occurs in the year following pregnancy among women who had severe pre-eclampsia during pregnancy. The lingering hypertension may go unnoticed because it often doesn’t present as classic high readings in the doctor’s office. Offering post-pregnancy ambulatory blood pressure monitoring to all women who have severe pre-eclampsia may help detect those whose blood pressures might be high despite normal readings in doctors’ offices. https://newsroom.heart.org/news/severe-pre-eclampsia-often-leads-to-undetected-high-blood-pressure-after-pregnancyMon, 05 Feb 2018 10:00:00 GMT

More than 100 million Americans have high blood pressure, AHA says

Wed, 01/31/2018 - 13:01
DALLAS, Jan. 31, 2018 — The number of Americans at risk for heart attacks and strokes just got a lot higher. An estimated 103 million U.S. adults have high blood pressure, according to new statistics from the American Heart Association. That’s nearly half of all adults in the United States.

“With the aging of the population and increased life expectancy, the prevalence of high blood pressure is expected to continue to increase,” said epidemiologist Dr. Paul Muntner, co-chair of the group that wrote the AHA’s Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics—2018 Update, published Wednesday in Circulation. Read more from AHA News

 American Heart Association News covers heart disease, stroke and related health issues. Not all views expressed in American Heart Association News stories reflect the official position of the American Heart Association.  Copyright is owned or held by the American Heart Association, Inc., and all rights are reserved. Permission is granted, at no cost and without need for further request, to link to, quote, excerpt or reprint from these stories in any medium as long as no text is altered and proper attribution is made to the American Heart Association News. See full terms of use.  

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The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association receives funding mostly from individuals. Foundations and corporations donate as well, and fund specific programs and events. Strict policies are enforced to prevent these relationships from influencing the Association's science content. Financial information for the American Heart Association, including a list of contributions from pharmaceutical companies and device manufacturers, is available at http://www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Media Inquiries:  For American Heart Association News stories on Heart.org, please contact editor@heart.org.

For other media inquiries: please call 214-706-1173

Public Inquiries: (800)-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

Life is why we fund scientific breakthroughs that save and improve lives.

]]>Media AlertsHeart NewsStroke NewsWed, 31 Jan 2018 18:01:18 GMTDALLAS, Jan. 31, 2018 — The number of Americans at risk for heart attacks and strokes just got a lot higher. An estimated 103 million U.S. adults have high blood pressure, according to new statistics from the American Heart Association. That’s nearly...https://newsroom.heart.org/news/more-than-100-million-americans-have-high-blood-pressure-aha-saysWed, 31 Jan 2018 18:00:00 GMT

Stress and diet associated with brain bleeds in sub-Saharan Africa

Fri, 01/26/2018 - 11:18
Embargoed until 8:45 a.m. Pacific Time 11:45 a.m. Eastern Time, Friday, Jan. 26, 2018

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 26, 2018 — Stress may double the risk of brain bleeds related to high blood pressure, while consuming green leafy vegetables is strongly protective, according to the largest study of stroke in sub-Saharan Africa, presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2018, a world premier meeting dedicated to the science and treatment of cerebrovascular disease for researchers and clinicians.

Intracerebral hemorrhage – bleeding within the brain – takes a high toll on working-age people in Nigeria and Ghana, with high blood pressure accounting for more than 90 percent of this often-lethal type of stroke.

In a new report from the Stroke Investigative Research and Educational Network, researchers studied 682 patients (average age 53.7 years) at 15 sites in Nigeria and Ghana who experienced brain bleeds. Bleeding strokes accounted for 32.2 percent of all strokes in the study (a much higher percentage than in the United States). Of the bleeding strokes, 93.9 percent were determined to be related to high blood pressure, 7.2 percent to structural abnormalities such as a bulging weak area of a blood vessel, and much smaller percentages to other medical conditions or medication use.

Comparing patients with high blood pressure-related brain bleeds to similar people in the same communities without stroke, the researchers found that the risks were:

  • 2.33 times as high in people with diabetes;
  • 2.22 times as high in people who reported more stress at home and work;
  • 1.69 times as high in people with abnormal cholesterol levels;
  • 10.01 times as high in tobacco smokers; and
  • 64 percent lower in people who reported eating more green, leafy vegetables.

Researchers say reducing stress and increasing green leafy vegetable consumption may be a novel way to reduce the rates of brain bleeds.

National Institutes of Health (NINDS, NHGRI and NIH Common fund) funded the study under the H3Africa initiative.

Mayowa Owolabi, Sc.M, Dr.M, FAAN, Center for Genomic and Precision Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria.

Presentation location: Room 502B

Additional Resources:

Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

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About the American Stroke Association

The American Stroke Association is devoted to saving people from stroke — the No. 2 cause of death in the world and a leading cause of serious disability. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat stroke. The Dallas-based association officially launched in 1998 as a division of the American Heart Association. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-888-4STROKE or visit StrokeAssociation.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA Spokesperson Perspective:

AHA News Media in Dallas: 214-706-1173

AHA News Media Office, Jan. 24-26, 2018 at the Los Angeles Convention Center: 213-743-6262

For Public Inquiries: 800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

 

 

]]>Scientific Conferences & MeetingsStroke NewsFri, 26 Jan 2018 16:46:04 GMTLOS ANGELES, Jan. 26, 2018 — Stress may double the risk of brain bleeds related to high blood pressure, while consuming green leafy vegetables is strongly...https://newsroom.heart.org/news/stress-and-diet-associated-with-brain-bleeds-in-sub-saharan-africaFri, 26 Jan 2018 16:45:00 GMT

Cancer patients less likely to receive clot-busting drugs after stroke

Fri, 01/26/2018 - 10:14
Embargoed until 8:12 a.m. Pacific Time 11:12 a.m. Eastern Time, Friday, Jan. 26, 2018

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 26, 2018 — When a stroke occurs in patients with cancer, they are one-third less likely to receive standard clot-busting medication as patients without a malignancy, according to preliminary research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2018, a world premier meeting dedicated to the science and treatment of cerebrovascular disease for researchers and clinicians.

Cancer patients frequently have strokes, which can occur due to traditional risk factors or from risks associated with cancer (such as blood that clots more easily) or its treatment. Over time, the use of both clot-dissolving drugs and procedures that mechanically remove clots following stroke have increased. The current study sought to determine whether these approaches increased as much in stroke patients with cancer (excluding those with brain cancer).

In a national sample, the researchers found:

  • The use of clot-busting medication rose from 0.01 percent in 1998 to 4.23 percent in 2013 in cancer patients with stroke, but its use remains about one-third lower than in patients without cancer.
  • The use of newer procedures to mechanically remove clots rose from 0.05 percent in 2006 to 1.07 percent in 2013 in cancer patients with stroke, and is similar to its use in patients without cancer.

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke funded the study.

Babak B. Navi, M.D., Weill Cornell Medicine, New York City.

Presentation location: Room 515A

Additional Resources:

Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

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About the American Stroke Association

The American Stroke Association is devoted to saving people from stroke — the No. 2 cause of death in the world and a leading cause of serious disability. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat stroke. The Dallas-based association officially launched in 1998 as a division of the American Heart Association. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-888-4STROKE or visit StrokeAssociation.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA Spokesperson Perspective:

AHA News Media in Dallas: 214-706-1173

AHA News Media Office, Jan. 24-26, 2018 at the Los Angeles Convention Center: 213-743-6262

For Public Inquiries: 800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

 

 

]]>Scientific Conferences & MeetingsStroke NewsFri, 26 Jan 2018 16:12:03 GMTLOS ANGELES, Jan. 26, 2018 — When a stroke occurs in patients with cancer, they are one-third less likely to receive standard clot-busting medication as patients...https://newsroom.heart.org/news/cancer-patients-less-likely-to-receive-clot-busting-drugs-after-strokeFri, 26 Jan 2018 16:12:00 GMT

Simple test speeds recognition of posterior stroke

Thu, 01/25/2018 - 17:32
Embargoed until 3 p.m. Pacific Time 6 p.m. Eastern Time, Thursday, Jan. 25, 2018

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 25, 2018 — A simple finger-to-nose test by medical professionals almost doubled the recognition of possible stroke involving the circulation at the back of the brain, according to preliminary research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2018, a world premier meeting dedicated to the science and treatment of cerebrovascular disease for researchers and clinicians.

Posterior strokes represent up to a quarter of all stroke admissions to the hospital, but there are often delays in diagnosis because the patients may not have the typical stroke signs included in screening tools used by emergency medical technicians (EMTs).

In a new study, researchers compared the recognition of posterior strokes between EMTs who received standard training in stroke screening with EMTs who received standard training plus in-person training in the “finger-to-nose test.” In this simple coordination test the patient alternates touching their own nose and the examiner’s finger. Performance can be impaired in posterior stroke.

The researchers found:

  • After training including the finger-to-nose test, EMTs recognized 12 of 16 (75 percent) posterior strokes, compared with 9 of 26 (38 percent) in the 12 months prior to training.

  • After routine training (not including the finger-to-nose test), EMTs recognized 13 of 28 (46 percent) posterior strokes, compared with 10 of 36 (28 percent) in the 12 months prior to training, an improvement that was not statistically significant.

The Midwest Affiliate of the American Heart Association (American Heart Association Mentored Clinical & Population Research Award) funded the study.

John A. Oostema, M.D., Michigan State University, College of Human Medicine, Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Note: Scientific presentation is 5:15 p.m. PT, Thursday, Jan. 25, 2018.

Presentation location: Hall H

Additional Resources:

Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

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About the American Stroke Association

The American Stroke Association is devoted to saving people from stroke — the No. 2 cause of death in the world and a leading cause of serious disability. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat stroke. The Dallas-based association officially launched in 1998 as a division of the American Heart Association. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-888-4STROKE or visit StrokeAssociation.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA Spokesperson Perspective:

AHA News Media in Dallas: 214-706-1173

AHA News Media Office, Jan. 24-26, 2018 at the Los Angeles Convention Center: 213-743-6262

For Public Inquiries: 800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

 

 

]]>Scientific Conferences & MeetingsStroke NewsThu, 25 Jan 2018 23:00:06 GMTLOS ANGELES, Jan. 25, 2018 — A simple finger-to-nose test by medical professionals almost doubled the recognition of possible stroke involving the circulation at the back...https://newsroom.heart.org/news/simple-test-speeds-recognition-of-posterior-strokeThu, 25 Jan 2018 23:00:00 GMT

Asian-American ethnicity associated with severe stroke, worse outcomes

Thu, 01/25/2018 - 17:32
Study Highlights:

  • Asian-American race was more associated with severe ischemic strokes and worse outcomes than being whites.
  • Asian-Americans tend to receive clot busting stroke treatment less frequently than whites.   

Embargoed until 3 p.m. Pacific Time / 6 p.m. Eastern Time Thursday, Jan. 25, 2018

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 25, 2018 — Asian Americans were more likely to experience a severe ischemic stroke and have worse outcomes than whites, according to preliminary research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2018, a world premier meeting dedicated to the science and treatment of cerebrovascular disease for researchers and clinicians.

Little is known about stroke care and trends over time in Asian Americans. This study is the largest analysis of clinical and functional outcomes for Asian-American acute ischemic stroke patients. Researchers reviewed the clinical and functional outcomes of more than 1.77 million ischemic stroke patients (3.6 percent Asian American and 96.4 percent white).

“Asian Americans may have a distinctive pathophysiologic profile of ischemic stroke than whites,” said Sarah Song, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., study author and assistant professor of cerebrovascular disease in the Department of Neurology at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, Illinois. “Regardless, this study highlights the need for more focused research, improved stroke prevention and possibly different treatment strategies for Asian Americans.”

In the large analysis, researchers also found that compared to whites, being Asian-American was associated with:

  • poorer functional recovery;
  • receiving the clot-busting drug tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) less frequently, which can improve the chances of recovering from a stroke; and
  • more serious and bleeding complications with tPA, despite receiving it quickly.

One good point the findings revealed, she said, is that stroke care for both Asian Americans and whites seems to have improved over time. “Looking from 2004 to 2016, our study shows that overall, patients with acute ischemic stroke are recovering more, and they are receiving more IV tPA, with less complications and better post-stroke care. This likely has to do with an overall improvement in stroke quality and highly effective stroke systems of care. However, Asian Americans and whites had nuanced differences over time; for example, only whites had a decrease in trend in stroke severity, while Asian Americans had a greater increase in timely IV tPA administration.”

Researchers used clinical characteristics, treatment patterns and outcomes from acute ischemic stroke admissions for Asian-American and white patients from 2004 through 2016 from 2,171 hospitals participating in Get With The Guidelines-Stroke – the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association in-hospital program that focuses on improving stroke care by promoting consistent adherence to the latest scientific treatment guidelines.

Limited attention has been given to stroke and stroke care in Asian-American minorities, due to barriers in care, education and research. In addition, Song said, “Even among Asian Americans, the various minority populations differ in so many ways. Vietnamese people are not the same as Korean, who are not the same as Japanese or South Asian groups. Aside from differences in language, differences in stroke risk factors, diet and lifestyle, and other cultural factors, make compiling all Asian-American groups into one single group problematic.”

Putting all the groups together makes it difficult to pull out meaning for each group, which she considers a limitation of this study. “But I do think this is a very good first step,” Song said. “This information gives us the urgency and the credibility to do more research in Asian Americans, who have historically been understudied in the stroke and cardiovascular literature.”

Co-authors are Li Liang, Ph.D.; Gregg Fonarow, M.D.; Eric E. Smith, M.D., MPH; Deepak Bhatt, M.D., MPH; Roland Matsouaka, Ph,D.; Ying Xian, M.D., Ph.D.; Lee Schwamm, M.D. and Jeffrey Saver, M.D.  Author disclosures are on the abstract.

The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Get with the Guidelines-Stroke database provided the data for the study.

Note: Scientific presentation is 5:15 p.m. PT, Thursday, Jan. 25, 2018.

Presentation location: Hall H

Additional Resources:

Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

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About the American Stroke Association

The American Stroke Association is devoted to saving people from stroke — the No. 2 cause of death in the world and a leading cause of serious disability. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat stroke. The Dallas-based association officially launched in 1998 as a division of the American Heart Association. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-888-4STROKE or visit StrokeAssociation.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA Spokesperson Perspective:

AHA News Media in Dallas: 214-706-1173

AHA News Media Office, Jan. 24-26, 2018 at the Los Angeles Convention Center: 213-743-6262

For Public Inquiries: 800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

]]>Scientific Conferences & MeetingsStroke NewsThu, 25 Jan 2018 23:00:06 GMTStudy Highlights: Asian-American race was more associated with severe ischemic strokes and worse outcomes than being whites. Asian-Americans tend to receive clot busting stroke treatment less frequently than whites.   Embargoed until 3...https://newsroom.heart.org/news/asian-american-ethnicity-associated-with-severe-stroke-worse-outcomesThu, 25 Jan 2018 23:00:00 GMT

Too few with stroke of the eye are treated to reduce future stroke

Thu, 01/25/2018 - 17:32
Study Highlights:

  • Only one-third of 5,600 patients with retinal infarction, or stroke in the eye, underwent basic stroke work-up, and fewer than one in 10 were seen by a neurologist.
  • One in 100 of the retinal infarction patients studied experienced another stroke within 90 days of their retinal infarction.

Embargoed until 3 p.m. Pacific Time/6 p.m. Eastern Time, Thursday, Jan. 25, 2018

This news release is featured in an embargoed media briefing at 3 p.m. PT Wed., Jan. 24, 2018

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 25, 2018 — Too few patients with retinal infarction, or loss of blood flow in the eye, are evaluated for stroke risk or seen by a neurologist, putting them at increased risk for another stroke, according to preliminary research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2018, a world premier meeting dedicated to the science and treatment of cerebrovascular disease for researchers and clinicians.

The study showed that 1 in 100 patients in the study experienced an ischemic stroke within 90 days of a retinal infarction. In addition, among 5,688 individuals with retinal infarction, only one-third underwent basic testing, and fewer than one in 10 were seen by a neurologist. Within 90 days of symptoms, only 34 percent received cervical carotid imaging tests; 28.6 percent received heart-rhythm testing; 23.3 percent received echocardiography; and 8.4 percent were evaluated by a neurologist.

The findings illustrate the importance of expediting stroke evaluation testing for those who have experienced a retinal infarction, and for increased awareness and understanding about retinal infarctions and how they may signal future strokes. Retinal infarction may provide an opportunity in preventing stroke, explained lead study author Alexander Merkler, M.D., a neurologist at Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York.

“Our research tells us that we need to do a better job at evaluating patients with retinal infarction and making sure they receive the same standard of care tests that someone with a stroke in the brain would have,” said Merkler. “We need to work more closely with ophthalmologists to ensure patients with stroke of the eye get the appropriate tests and treatments in a timely manner.”

The findings are based on Medicare ophthalmology claims from between 2009 and 2015. Retinal infarction is a form of ischemic stroke in the eye. Symptoms can include blurred vision or vision loss, and tissue damage to the eye itself. Risk factors associated with stroke in the brain, including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, and atrial fibrillation, are also associated with retinal infarction.

Stroke is the fifth-leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for one in every 20 deaths, but less is known about retinal infarction, which may go undetected and under-treated. Merkler plans to study the connections between retinal infarction and stroke using brain magnetic resonance imaging tests to see what’s happening.

Co-authors are Gina Gialdini, M.D.; Ajay Gupta, M.D.; and Hooman Kamel, M.D. Author disclosures are on the abstract.

Note: Scientific presentation is 5:30 p.m. Pacific Time, Thursday, Jan. 25, 2018.

Presentation location: Hall H

Additional Resources:

Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

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About the American Stroke Association

The American Stroke Association is devoted to saving people from stroke — the No. 2 cause of death in the world and a leading cause of serious disability. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat stroke. The Dallas-based association officially launched in 1998 as a division of the American Heart Association. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-888-4STROKE or visit StrokeAssociation.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA Spokesperson Perspective:

AHA News Media in Dallas: 214-706-1173

AHA News Media Office, Jan. 23-26, 2018 at the Los Angeles Convention Center: 213-743-6262

For Public Inquiries: 800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

]]>Scientific Conferences & MeetingsStroke NewsThu, 25 Jan 2018 23:00:06 GMTStudy Highlights: Only one-third of 5,600 patients with retinal infarction, or stroke in the eye, underwent basic stroke work-up, and fewer than one in 10 were seen by a neurologist. One in 100 of the retinal infarction patients studied experienced...https://newsroom.heart.org/news/too-few-with-stroke-of-the-eye-are-treated-to-reduce-future-strokeThu, 25 Jan 2018 23:00:00 GMT

Working before and after stroke is good for brain health

Thu, 01/25/2018 - 17:32
Study Highlights:

  • Working-age adults who suffer stroke are likely to have healthier brains, sharper minds and less risk of depression and death two years after stroke if they worked prior to stroke, versus being unemployed.
  • Those who work after stroke also seem to benefit with better long-term cognitive status than those who don’t.

Embargoed until 3 p.m. Pacific Time/6 p.m. Eastern Time, Thursday, Jan. 25, 2018

This news release is featured in an embargoed media briefing at 3 p.m. PT Wed., Jan. 24, 2018

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 25, 2018 — Adult stroke patients who are employed prior to and after suffering strokes are more likely than unemployed adults to have healthier minds two years post stroke, according to preliminary research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2018, a world premier meeting dedicated to the science and treatment of cerebrovascular disease for researchers and clinicians.

“Studies have shown stroke greatly increases dementia risk, and occupational status might influence how stroke survivors fare years after having a stroke,” said study author Einor Ben Assayag, Ph.D., senior researcher in the neurology department at Tel-Aviv Sorasky Medical Center, Tel-Aviv, Israel. “We looked at how occupational status, brain health and cognitive decline might be interrelated after stroke.”

Ben Assayag and colleagues studied 252 working-age adult stroke survivors from the TABASCO study. They analyzed brain health early on after stroke, as well as cognitive changes, at one year and two years after stroke. “A novel aspect of this study was we also studied the association of inflammation with occupational status and cognitive changes after stroke,” she said.

They found:

  • People who were unemployed before stroke were more than three times (320 percent) more likely than those who were employed to develop cognitive decline within two years from the initial stroke.

  • In addition to having lower cognitive results post-stroke, those who were unemployed before stroke were more likely to have worse neurological deficit, higher depression scores and more elevated inflammation.

  • Adults who weren’t working before having a stroke were more likely to have unhealthy brain changes defined as reduced cortical thickness and white matter volume on imaging studies.

  • Those who were unemployed prior to stroke were more likely to have type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure.

  • During the two years of the study, 4.4 percent of participants died and 8.9 percent developed cognitive decline.

  • Returning to work after stroke was associated with lower cognitive decline risk.

“The message here is ‘keep on working,’” Ben Assayag said. “Rates of death and cognitive decline were higher among the unemployed people we studied. In fact, being unemployed was by itself a risk factor for cognitive decline and death.”

A limitation of the study is that it included only mild stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) patients, and not people with more severe strokes.

Co-authors are Hen Hallevi, M.D.; Jeremy Molad, M.D.; Amos Korczyn, M.D., M.Sc.; Efrat Kliper, Ph.D.; Ludmila Shopin, M.D.; Eitan Auriel, M.D., M.Sc.; Shani Shenhar-Tsarfaty, Ph.D.; Victoria Volfson, M.Sc.; and Natan M. Bornstein, M.D. Author disclosures are on the abstract.

The American Federation for Aging Research and U.S.-Israel Bi-National Science Foundation funded the study.

Note: Scientific presentation is 5:50 p.m. Pacific Time, Thursday, Jan. 25, 2018.

Presentation location: Hall H

Additional Resources:

  • Available downloadable video interviews with ASA expert and the study researcher, B-roll, animation and images related to this news release are on the right column of the release link
  • Stroke Prevention and Brain Health  
  • For more news at AHA International Stroke Conference 2018, follow us on Twitter @HeartNews  #ISC18.

Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

###

About the American Stroke Association

The American Stroke Association is devoted to saving people from stroke — the No. 2 cause of death in the world and a leading cause of serious disability. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat stroke. The Dallas-based association officially launched in 1998 as a division of the American Heart Association. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-888-4STROKE or visit StrokeAssociation.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA Spokesperson Perspective:

AHA News Media in Dallas: 214-706-1173

AHA News Media Office, Jan. 23-26, 2018 at the Los Angeles Convention Center: 213-743-6262

For Public Inquiries: 800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

 

]]>Scientific Conferences & MeetingsStroke NewsThu, 25 Jan 2018 23:00:04 GMTStudy Highlights: Working-age adults who suffer stroke are likely to have healthier brains, sharper minds and less risk of depression and death two years after stroke if they worked prior to stroke, versus being unemployed. Those who work after...https://newsroom.heart.org/news/working-before-and-after-stroke-is-good-for-brain-healthThu, 25 Jan 2018 23:00:00 GMT

A usually-ignored finding in the kidneys may signal stroke risk

Thu, 01/25/2018 - 17:32
Embargoed until 2:30 p.m. Pacific Time 5:30 p.m. Eastern Time, Thursday, Jan. 25, 2018

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 25, 2018 — Sacs of fluid in the kidneys may indicate there is also blood vessel damage in the brain and a heightened risk of stroke, according to preliminary research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2018, a world premier meeting dedicated to the science and treatment of cerebrovascular disease for researchers and clinicians.

Renal cysts (sacs of fluid in the kidneys) are common in older people and usually cause no symptoms. The cysts are often discovered when an ultrasound or CT scan is done for another purpose. Traditionally, renal cysts are regarded as benign kidney structural changes. Recent research suggests that renal cysts might represent an early stage of kidney damage. Since the kidney and brain have similar vascular anatomy and physiology, researchers wondered whether they might also signal blood vessel damage in the brain circulation and a heightened risk of stroke.

In a study of 2,984 people (average age 72 years, 57 percent female) from the general population in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, who underwent a kidney ultrasound, researchers examined medical records and found:

  • stroke prevalence was 1.63 times higher in people with a single renal cyst (found in 17 percent of participants) compared to no cysts;

  • stroke prevalence was even higher (2.14 times higher risk) in those with multiple renal cysts (found in 6.6 percent of participants) compared to those without cysts; and

  • the associations were independent of other stroke risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes and age.

The Rotterdam Study is funded by Erasmus Medical Center and Erasmus University, Rotterdam, Netherlands Organization for the Health Research and Development (ZonMw), the Research Institute for Diseases in the Elderly (RIDE), the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science, the Ministry for Health, Welfare and Sports, the European Commission (DG XII), and the Municipality of Rotterdam.

Sanaz Sedaghat, Ph.D., Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Presentation location: 502B

Additional Resources:

Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

###

About the American Stroke Association

The American Stroke Association is devoted to saving people from stroke — the No. 2 cause of death in the world and a leading cause of serious disability. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat stroke. The Dallas-based association officially launched in 1998 as a division of the American Heart Association. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-888-4STROKE or visit StrokeAssociation.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA Spokesperson Perspective:

AHA News Media in Dallas: 214-706-1173

AHA News Media Office, Jan. 24-26, 2018 at the Los Angeles Convention Center: 213-743-6262

For Public Inquiries: 800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

 

 

]]>Scientific Conferences & MeetingsStroke NewsThu, 25 Jan 2018 22:30:05 GMTLOS ANGELES, Jan. 25, 2018 — Sacs of fluid in the kidneys may indicate there is also blood vessel damage in the brain and a heightened risk of stroke, according to...https://newsroom.heart.org/news/a-usually-ignored-finding-in-the-kidneys-may-signal-stroke-riskThu, 25 Jan 2018 22:30:00 GMT

MIND diet slows cognitive decline in stroke survivors

Thu, 01/25/2018 - 16:29
Study Highlights:

  • The MIND diet, which zeros in on foods that promote brain health, including vegetables, berries, fish and olive oil, helps to greatly slow cognitive decline in stroke survivors.
  • In prior studies, neither adherence to the Mediterranean or the DASH diet patterns were significantly associated with slower decline in cognitive abilities.
  • More research is needed to confirm the role of diet in stroke survivors’ long-term cognitive health.

Embargoed until 2:18 p.m. Pacific Time/5:18 p.m. Eastern Time, Thursday, Jan.25, 2018

This news release is featured in an embargoed media briefing at 3 p.m. PT Wed., Jan. 24, 2018

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 25, 2018 — A diet that zeros in on foods that promote brain health, including vegetables, berries, fish and olive oil, helps to substantially slow cognitive decline in stroke survivors, according to preliminary research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2018, a world premier meeting dedicated to the science and treatment of cerebrovascular disease for researchers and clinicians.

The Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay, or MIND, is a combination of the nutritionally healthy DASH and Mediterranean diets, but with modifications based on the best scientific evidence on nutrition and brain health. Other foods featured in the MIND diet include nuts, beans, poultry, whole grains and moderate wine consumption. It limits red meats and red meat products, butter, trans fat margarines, cheese, sweets and pastries as well as fried and fast foods.

Study co-author Martha Clare Morris, Sc.D., a nutritional epidemiologist at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, is the lead creator of the MIND diet, which has been associated with reduced Alzheimer’s risk in seniors who adhered closely to its recommendations.

“We know that stroke survivors are twice as likely to develop dementia compared to the general population. I was really intrigued by the results of a previous MIND study, which showed that the people who were most highly adherent to the MIND diet cognitively functioned as if they were 7.5 years younger than the least adherent group. It made me wonder if those findings would hold true for stroke survivors,” said Laurel J. Cherian, M.D., M.S, co-study author and vascular neurologist and assistant professor of neurological sciences at Rush University Medical Center.

Cherian and colleagues studied 106 stroke survivors for cognitive decline, including decline in one’s ability to think, reason and remember. They assessed people in the study every year, for an average of 4.7 years, and monitored patients’ eating habits, grouping them into those who were highly adherent to MIND, moderately adherent and least adherent to the diet. They also examined factors that are known to affect cognitive performance, including age, gender, education level, participation in cognitively stimulating activities, physical activity, smoking and genetics.

They found:

  • Those in the most adherent MIND group had a substantially slower rate of cognitive decline than people who adhered least to the diet.

  • The estimated effect of the diet remained strong even after taking into account participants’ level of education and participation in cognitive and physical activities.

  • While adherence to the MIND diet was highly associated with slower rate of cognitive decline in stroke patients, the Mediterranean and DASH diets, were not associated with slower cognitive decline.

“The Mediterranean and DASH diets have been shown to be protective against coronary artery disease and stroke, but it seems the nutrients emphasized in the MIND diet may be better suited to overall brain health and preserving cognition,” Cherian said.

According to Cherian, studies have found that folate, vitamin E, omega-3 fatty acids, carotenoids and flavonoids are associated with slower rates of cognitive decline, while things like saturated and hydrogenated fats have been associated with dementia.

“I like to think of the MIND diet as a way to supercharge the nutritional content of what we eat. The goal is to emphasize foods that will not only lower our risk of heart attacks and stroke, but make our brains as resilient as possible to cognitive decline,” she said. “Our study suggests that if we choose the right foods, we may be able to protect stroke survivors from cognitive decline. This is a preliminary study that will hopefully be confirmed by other studies, including research looking specifically at stroke survivors. For now, I think there is enough information to encourage stroke patients to view food as one of their most powerful tools to optimize their brain health.”

The main limitation of the study is that it’s observational and findings cannot be interpreted in a cause-and-effect relationship. The study is also relatively small.

Other co-authors are Neelum T. Aggarwal, M.D.; Thomas Holland, M.D.; Puja Agarwal, Ph.D.; Yamin Wang, Ph.D.; Keiko Fukuda, B.A.; and Martha C Morris, Sc.D. Author disclosures are on the abstract. The National Institute on Aging funded the study.

Presentation location: Room 515A

Additional Resources:

Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

###

About the American Stroke Association

The American Stroke Association is devoted to saving people from stroke — the No. 2 cause of death in the world and a leading cause of serious disability. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat stroke. The Dallas-based association officially launched in 1998 as a division of the American Heart Association. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-888-4STROKE or visit StrokeAssociation.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA Spokesperson Perspective:

AHA News Media in Dallas: 214-706-1173

AHA News Media Office, Jan. 24-26, 2018 at the Los Angeles Convention Center: 213-743-6262

For Public Inquiries: 800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

 

]]>Scientific Conferences & MeetingsStroke NewsThu, 25 Jan 2018 22:18:04 GMTStudy Highlights: The MIND diet, which zeros in on foods that promote brain health, including vegetables, berries, fish and olive oil, helps to greatly slow cognitive decline in stroke survivors. In prior studies, neither adherence to the...https://newsroom.heart.org/news/mind-diet-slows-cognitive-decline-in-stroke-survivorsThu, 25 Jan 2018 22:18:00 GMT

Better insurance access hasn’t eliminated cost barriers to post-stroke meds

Thu, 01/25/2018 - 16:29
Embargoed until 1:30 p.m. Pacific Time 4:30 p.m. Eastern Time, Thursday, Jan. 25, 2018

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 25, 2018 — Despite federal programs to improve the availability of medical insurance, drug costs still keep more than one in ten stroke survivors from obtaining their recommended medications, putting them at risk of another stroke, according to preliminary research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2018, a world premier meeting dedicated to the science and treatment of cerebrovascular disease for researchers and clinicians.

Researchers examined the impact of the Affordable Care Act, which gave more individuals the option of purchasing health insurance and gave states the option of expanding eligibility for Medicaid, on the proportion of stroke survivors who are unable to afford their medication.

Using information from the National Health Interview Survey, researchers found that the percentage of young stroke survivors (aged 45-64) who were uninsured fell 53 percent, from 15 percent to 7 percent, between 2010 and 2015. This change was accompanied by an increase in Medicaid coverage from 24 percent to 31 percent.

However, the percentage of young stroke patients who did not obtain recommended medications due to cost concerns did not change significantly from 2010 to 2015. About 21 percent of younger stroke survivors and 8 percent of stroke survivors 65 and older reported that cost prevented them from taking recommended medications in 2015.

Study author Deborah A. Levine, M.D., M.P.H. receives support from the National Institutes of Health.

Deborah A. Levine, M.D., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Presentation location: Room 515B

Additional Resources:

Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at http://www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

###

About the American Stroke Association

The American Stroke Association is devoted to saving people from stroke — the No. 2 cause of death in the world and a leading cause of serious disability. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat stroke. The Dallas-based association officially launched in 1998 as a division of the American Heart Association. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-888-4STROKE or visit StrokeAssociation.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA Spokesperson Perspective:

AHA News Media in Dallas: 214-706-1173

AHA News Media Office, Jan. 24-26, 2018 at the Los Angeles Convention Center: 213-743-6262

For Public Inquiries: 800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

 

 

]]>Scientific Conferences & MeetingsStroke NewsThu, 25 Jan 2018 21:30:05 GMTLOS ANGELES, Jan. 25, 2018 — Despite federal programs to improve the availability of medical insurance, drug costs still keep more than one in ten stroke survivors...https://newsroom.heart.org/news/better-insurance-access-hasnt-eliminated-cost-barriers-to-post-stroke-medsThu, 25 Jan 2018 21:30:00 GMT

Combining drugs that lower blood pressure and cholesterol could do more to prevent stroke

Thu, 01/25/2018 - 10:07
Study Highlights:

  • Combining medication that lowers blood pressure with medication that lowers cholesterol reduced first-time strokes by 44 percent.
  • For those with very high blood pressure — readings 143.5 mm Hg or higher — taking two types of blood pressure-lowering drugs together every day reduced stroke by 42 percent.

Embargoed until 8 a.m. Pacific Time/11 a.m. Eastern Time, Thursday Jan. 25, 2018

This news release is featured in an embargoed media briefing at 3 p.m. PT Wed., Jan. 24, 2018

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 25, 2018 — Combining medication that lowers blood pressure with medication that lowers cholesterol reduced first-time strokes by 44 percent, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2018, a world premier meeting dedicated to the science and treatment of cerebrovascular disease for researchers and clinicians.

Seventy-five percent of strokes are first-time strokes. High blood pressure and high cholesterol both increase the risk for stroke, the fifth leading cause of death in America. Yet, it’s not known whether combining drugs that lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels can protect individuals from stroke.

Now, a study involving 12,705 participants from 21 countries shows that individually, drugs that lower blood pressure or cholesterol do indeed reduce stroke risk, but when combined, they offer even greater protection.

Among the findings:

  • Taking daily doses of two blood pressure drugs (fixed dose candesartan and hydrochlorothiazide) along with a cholesterol-lowering drug (low-dose rosuvastatin), proved to be the most effective, cutting first-time strokes by 44 percent among patients at intermediate risk for heart disease.

  • For those with very high blood pressure -- readings 143.5 mm Hg or higher -- taking 16 milligrams of candesartan plus 12.5 milligrams of hydrochlorothiazide every day reduced stroke by 42 percent.

  • Compared with a placebo, stroke was reduced by 30 percent among participants taking daily doses of 10 milligrams of rosuvastatin.

“These results indicate that to prevent stroke in those at moderate risk, blood pressure lowering plus cholesterol-lowering should be considered in those with elevated blood pressure, and cholesterol-lowering should definitely be considered for all,” said lead study author Jackie Bosch, Ph.D., McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. “These are existing drugs that are well-tolerated, have strong safety profiles and it is easy for patients to stick with them.”

The findings come from the Heart Outcomes Prevention Evaluation Study, a large, international study focused on heart disease and stroke prevention. The average age of the participants was 66 years; 46 percent were women, and 166 strokes occurred during an average follow-up of 5.6 years. At the start of the study, the average blood pressure was 138/82 mm Hg. A normal blood pressure reading is around 120/80 mm Hg.

Based on these findings, Bosch said researchers are now looking at developing a single pill that produces the same effects as taking multiple pills that lower both blood pressure and cholesterol.

Co-authors are Evan Lonn, M.D.; Jun Zhu, M.D.; Prem Pais, M.D.; Denis Xavier, M.D.; Antonio Dans, M.D.; Rafael Diaz, M.D.; Robert Hart, M.D.;and Salim Yusuf, M.B. B.S., D.Phil. Author disclosures are on the abstract. The National Institutes of Health funded the study.

Presentation location: Room 515A

Additional Resources:

  • Available downloadable video interviews with ASA expert and the study researcher, B-roll, animation and images related to this news release are on the right column of the release link
  • Stroke Prevention
  • For more news at AHA International Stroke Conference 2018, follow us on Twitter @HeartNews  #ISC18.

Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

###

About the American Stroke Association

The American Stroke Association is devoted to saving people from stroke — the No. 2 cause of death in the world and a leading cause of serious disability. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat stroke. The Dallas-based association officially launched in 1998 as a division of the American Heart Association. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-888-4STROKE or visit StrokeAssociation.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA Spokesperson Perspective:

AHA News Media in Dallas: 214-706-1173

AHA News Media Office, Jan. 24-26, 2018 at the Los Angeles Convention Center: 213-743-6262

For Public Inquiries: 800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

 

]]>Scientific Conferences & MeetingsStroke NewsThu, 25 Jan 2018 16:00:05 GMTStudy Highlights: Combining medication that lowers blood pressure with medication that lowers cholesterol reduced first-time strokes by 44 percent. For those with very high blood pressure — readings 143.5 mm Hg or higher — taking two types of blood...https://newsroom.heart.org/news/combining-drugs-that-lower-blood-pressure-and-cholesterol-could-do-more-to-prevent-strokeThu, 25 Jan 2018 16:00:00 GMT

Prompt clot-grabbing treatment produces better stroke outcomes

Thu, 01/25/2018 - 09:07
Embargoed until 7 a.m. Pacific Time 10 a.m. Eastern Time, Thursday, Jan. 25, 2018

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 25, 2018 — Clot removal may be beneficial up to 24 hours following stroke in carefully selected patients, but every hour delayed after symptoms begin may be associated with more disability, according to preliminary research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2018, a world premier meeting dedicated to the science and treatment of cerebrovascular disease for researchers and clinicians.

The international DAWN trial previously demonstrated that patients with a small area of irreversible brain damage and a large area of brain at jeopardy of being lost if the clot remains are more likely to recover with minimal disability if the clot is removed up to 24 hours after symptoms begin or were noticed. It is already well-established that the benefit of clot removal declines each hour during the first 6 hours after symptoms are detected.

In the current analysis of treatment between 6 and 24 hours after symptoms were observed, or after the person was last seen to be well, researchers found:

  • each 1-hour delay reduces the chance of recovery with minimal or no disability by 11 percent; and

  • treatment remains beneficial through 24 hours, with patients who had their clots removed being 35.5 percent more likely to have minimal or no disability 90 days later, but the overall effect of treatment declines with time.

The current results demonstrate the importance of prompt imaging and treatment of patients with clot-caused stroke, even in those who wake up having experienced a stroke or who for other reasons are not identified in the first few hours after the onset of symptoms.

Stryker Neuroendovascular funded the DAWN Trial.

Raul G. Nogueira M.D., Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.

Presentation location: Room 151

Additional Resources:

Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

###

About the American Stroke Association

The American Stroke Association is devoted to saving people from stroke — the No. 2 cause of death in the world and a leading cause of serious disability. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat stroke. The Dallas-based association officially launched in 1998 as a division of the American Heart Association. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-888-4STROKE or visit StrokeAssociation.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA Spokesperson Perspective:

AHA News Media in Dallas: 214-706-1173

AHA News Media Office, Jan. 24-26, 2018 at the Los Angeles Convention Center: 213-743-6262

For Public Inquiries: 800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

 

 

]]>Scientific Conferences & MeetingsStroke NewsThu, 25 Jan 2018 15:00:06 GMTLOS ANGELES, Jan. 25, 2018 — Clot removal may be beneficial up to 24 hours following stroke in carefully selected patients, but every hour delayed after symptoms begin may...https://newsroom.heart.org/news/prompt-clot-grabbing-treatment-produces-better-stroke-outcomesThu, 25 Jan 2018 15:00:00 GMT

Brain stimulation plus adult neural stem cells may speed stroke recovery

Wed, 01/24/2018 - 17:47
Embargoed until 3:12 p.m. Pacific Time 6:12 p.m. Eastern Time, Wednesday, Jan. 24, 2018

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 24, 2018 — Electrically stimulating implanted adult stem cells may someday speed stroke recovery, according to preliminary research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2018, a world premier meeting dedicated to the science and treatment of cerebrovascular disease for researchers and clinicians.

Stem cell injections are already being studied in people who are slow to recover after an ischemic stroke (clot-caused stroke). In this study, researchers implanted human neural stem cells in 10 rats and tested whether electrically stimulating the cells might lead to increased stem cell production and faster stroke recovery.

A conductive polymer scaffold which can be precisely stimulated with electricity was seeded with human neural stem cells and implanted into some of the animals one-week after stroke was induced. After six weeks of behavioral tests, researchers found the quickest recovery and increased production of the animal’s own stem cells occurred in those who received implanted stem cells plus three days of electrical stimulation from implanted electrodes in the brain compared to recovery rates from rats who received 1) brain stimulation only or 2) stem cell implantation only or 3) none of these.

These results may help scientists design better ways to use stem cells to treat patients after stroke, researchers said.

The National Institutes of Health and the Stanford University School of Medicine Dean’s Postdoctoral Fellowship funded the study.

Byeongtaek Oh, Ph.D., Stanford university, Stanford, California.

Presentation location: Room 502B

Additional Resources:

Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

 ###

About the American Stroke Association

The American Stroke Association is devoted to saving people from stroke — the No. 2 cause of death in the world and a leading cause of serious disability. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat stroke. The Dallas-based association officially launched in 1998 as a division of the American Heart Association. To learn more or to get Time involved, call 1-888-4STROKE or visit StrokeAssociation.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA Spokesperson Perspective:

AHA News Media in Dallas: 214-706-1173

AHA News Media Office, Jan. 24-26, 2018 at the Los Angeles Convention Center: 213-743-6262

For Public Inquiries: 800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

]]>Stroke NewsScientific Conferences & MeetingsWed, 24 Jan 2018 23:12:04 GMTLOS ANGELES, Jan. 24, 2018 — Electrically stimulating implanted adult stem cells may someday speed stroke recovery, according to preliminary research presented at...https://newsroom.heart.org/news/brain-stimulation-plus-adult-neural-stem-cells-may-speed-stroke-recoveryWed, 24 Jan 2018 23:12:00 GMT

La apnea del sueño después de un accidente cerebrovascular aumenta el riesgo de sufrir otro accidente cerebrovascular o de fallecer

Wed, 01/24/2018 - 17:47
Prohibida su divulgación hasta las 15:00 h, hora del pacífico/18:00 h, hora del este, miércoles 24 de enero de 2018

LOS ÁNGELES, 24 de enero de 2018 — Los sobrevivientes de accidentes cerebrovasculares, en especial los mexicanos estadounidenses, cuyo sueño es interrumpido por pausas en la respiración (apnea del sueño) tienen más probabilidades de fallecer o de experimentar otro accidente cerebrovascular, de acuerdo con una investigación preliminar presentada en la Conferencia Internacional sobre Accidentes Cerebrovasculares 2018 de la American Stroke Association, un encuentro mundial principal dedicado a la ciencia y el tratamiento de las enfermedades cerebrovasculares para investigadores y médicos clínicos.

Hasta que se realizó este análisis de Vigilancia del ataque cerebral en Corpus Christi, no había datos prospectivos sobre la relación entre la apnea del sueño y los accidentes cerebrovasculares recurrentes o la muerte provenientes de poblaciones grandes y basados en la población o la diversidad étnica. El proyecto inscribió a 842 personas (65 de mediana edad, 47 por ciento mujeres, 58 por ciento mexicanos estadounidenses, 34 por ciento blancos no hispanos) que tuvieron un accidente cerebrovascular isquémico causado por una reducción en el suministro sanguíneo entre 2010 y 2015.

Mediante el uso de dispositivos portátiles para el control de la apnea del sueño, descubrieron que los participantes tenían una mediana de 14 pausas (completas o parciales) en la respiración por hora durante el sueño, el 63 por ciento de las cuales se identificaron con la apnea del sueño (10 o más pausas en la respiración por hora).

Durante el seguimiento (tiempo mediano hasta el evento de 584 días) los investigadores descubrieron lo siguiente:

  • El 10,7 por ciento experimentó otro accidente cerebrovascular y el 14,8 por ciento falleció.

  • Cada pausa adicional en la respiración por hora se asoció con un aumento del 9 por ciento en las probabilidades de sufrir un accidente cerebrovascular recurrente o la muerte.

  • Después de realizar el ajuste correspondiente a los factores de riesgo conocidos, el origen étnico mexicano estadounidense se asoció con un aumento de 1,7 veces en las probabilidades de sufrir un accidente cerebrovascular recurrente o la muerte.

La apnea del sueño puede ser un factor de riesgo modificable importante en lo que respecta a los resultados deficientes del accidente cerebrovascular en general, y abordar la afección puede ayudar a reducir las disparidades de salud relacionadas con el accidente cerebrovascular en los mexicanos estadounidenses, afirman los investigadores.

Este estudio ha sido financiado por los Institutos Nacionales de Salud (National Institutes of Health).

Dr. Devin L. Brown, de la Universidad de Michigan, en Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Nota: La ponencia científica tendrá lugar a las 18:20 h, horario del Pacífico, miércoles 24 de enero de 2018.

Lugar de la ponencia: Salón H

Recursos adicionales:

Las afirmaciones y conclusiones de los autores del estudio que se presentan en las reuniones científicas de la American Heart Association son exclusivas de dichos autores y no constituyen necesariamente la política ni la posición de la asociación. La asociación no representa ni garantiza la precisión ni la fiabilidad de la información proporcionada. La financiación recibida por la asociación proviene principalmente de individuos. No obstante, numerosas fundaciones y corporaciones (entre las que se incluyen compañías farmacéuticas y fabricantes de dispositivos, entre otros) realizan donaciones y financian programas y eventos específicos de la asociación. La asociación dispone de políticas estrictas para evitar que estas relaciones influyan en el contenido científico. En el siguiente vínculo encontrará información sobre las aportaciones realizadas por corporaciones farmacéuticas y de fabricación de dispositivos: www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

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Acerca de la American Stroke Association

La American Stroke Association se dedica a luchar contra los accidentes cerebrovasculares, las segunda causa de muerte en el mundo y una causa principal de discapacidad grave. Trabajamos de manera conjunta con millones de voluntarios con el fin de financiar investigaciones innovadoras, conseguir políticas de salud pública más eficaces y proporcionar herramientas e información de emergencia para evitar y tratar el accidente cerebrovascular. La asociación, con sede en Dallas, se presentó oficialmente en 1998 como una división de la American Heart Association. Para obtener más información o sumarse a nuestra misión, llame al 1-888-4STROKE o visite StrokeAssociation.org. Síganos en Facebook y Twitter.

Si es un representante de un medio de comunicación o desea ponerse en contacto con el portavoz de la AHA:

Prensa de la AHA en Dallas: 214-706-1173

Oficina de prensa de la AHA, del 24 al 26 de enero de 2018 en el Centro de Convenciones de Los Ángeles: 213-743-6262.

Para consultas públicas: 800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org y strokeassociation.org

 

]]>Scientific Conferences & MeetingsForeign Language News ReleasesStroke NewsWed, 24 Jan 2018 23:00:07 GMTLOS ÁNGELES, 24 de enero de 2018 — Los sobrevivientes de accidentes cerebrovasculares, en especial los mexicanos estadounidenses, cuyo...https://newsroom.heart.org/news/la-apnea-del-sueno-despues-de-un-accidente-cerebrovascular-aumenta-el-riesgo-de-sufrir-otro-accidente-cerebrovascular-o-de-fallecerWed, 24 Jan 2018 23:00:00 GMT

Sleep apnea after stroke heightens risk of another stroke; death

Wed, 01/24/2018 - 17:47
Embargoed until 3 p.m. Pacific Time/ 6 p.m. Eastern Time, Wednesday, Jan. 24, 2018

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 24, 2018 — Stroke survivors, especially Mexican-Americans, whose sleep is interrupted by pauses in breathing (sleep apnea) are more likely to die or experience another stroke, according to preliminary research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2018, a world premier meeting dedicated to the science and treatment of cerebrovascular disease for researchers and clinicians.

Until this analysis of the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi, there were no prospective data on the relationship between sleep apnea and recurrent stroke or death from large, population-based or ethnically diverse populations. The project enrolled 842 people (median age 65, 47 percent female, 58 percent Mexican American, 34 percent non-Hispanic white) who had an ischemic stroke caused by decreased blood supply between 2010-2015.

Using portable sleep apnea-monitoring devices, they found participants had a median of 14 pauses (full or partial) in breathing per hour during sleep, with 63 percent identified with sleep apnea (10 or more breathing pauses/hour).

During follow-up (median time to event 584 days) researchers found:

  • 10.7 percent experienced another stroke and 14.8 percent died.

  • Each additional pause in breathing per hour was associated with a 9 percent increase in recurrent stroke or death.

  • After adjusting for known risk factors, Mexican-American ethnicity was associated with a 1.7-fold increased risk in recurrent stroke or death.

Sleep apnea may be an important modifiable risk factor for poor stroke outcomes in general, and addressing the condition may help reduce stroke related health disparities in Mexican-Americans, researchers said.

The National Institutes of Health funded the study.

Devin L. Brown, M.D., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Note: Scientific presentation is 6:20 p.m. PT, Wednesday, Jan. 24, 2018.

Presentation location: Hall H

Additional Resources:

Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

###

About the American Stroke Association

The American Stroke Association is devoted to saving people from stroke — the No. 2 cause of death in the world and a leading cause of serious disability. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat stroke. The Dallas-based association officially launched in 1998 as a division of the American Heart Association. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-888-4STROKE or visit StrokeAssociation.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA Spokesperson Perspective:

AHA News Media in Dallas: 214-706-1173

AHA News Media Office, Jan. 24-26, 2018 at the Los Angeles Convention Center: 213-743-6262.

For Public Inquiries: 800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

]]>Scientific Conferences & MeetingsStroke NewsWed, 24 Jan 2018 23:00:07 GMTLOS ANGELES, Jan. 24, 2018 — Stroke survivors, especially Mexican-Americans, whose sleep is interrupted by pauses in breathing (sleep apnea) are more likely to die or...https://newsroom.heart.org/news/sleep-apnea-after-stroke-heightens-risk-of-another-stroke-deathWed, 24 Jan 2018 23:00:00 GMT

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